Use a Registered Electrician in Your Home

 

What do Electricians do?
Electricians are tradesmen who are responsible for designing, installing, maintaining and repairing electrical wiring systems. These systems are located in most buildings from homes to public facilities in both commercial and industrial buildings as well as machines and large pieces of equipment. Electricians can work either outside or inside to make sure the lights, television, appliances, equipment and sockets in your home are working properly and safely. Because all of these items are essential in everyday life, the job of an electrician can be demanding.

 

Electrical Services in Homes
electricianElectrical work in the home needs to be done by someone who has the knowledge and qualifications to do so. By law the homeowner or landlord has to provide evidence that states all the electrical installation work meets the standards of the Building Regulations.

 

 

Benefits of a Registered Electrician
It is recommended that you use a registered electrician to repair or check your home. Using a registered electrician in and around your home makes certain that the work being done is safe and follows the guidelines set by the government. Any electrical installations, repairs, replacements or maintenance should be done by a registered electrical engineer to ensure the safety of your home and the people in it.

Tips On Moving Premises

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Top Tips

1. Draw up a preliminary budget. Costs may include acquiring and fitting out your new premises, upgrading equipment and vacating your existing premises (for example, repairs you may have to pay for under the terms of your lease). When drawing up the budget, bear in mind you may also incur expenses for redundancy, relocation, recruitment and time lost during the move.

2. Check there are no legal problems to stop you leaving your old premises or moving into the new ones. If your old lease overlaps with the new one, you may be eligible for relief on your business rates.

3. Work out a programme of things to do at least six months ahead of the moving date. Keeping your customers and employees informed and happy throughout the process will minimise the disruption to your business.

4. Consult all employees (and trade union representatives, if applicable) well in advance. Relocating without employees’ agreement could cause serious problems. Remember that relocation is not a sufficient reason for redundancy unless your new premises will be too far away for reasonable travel.

5. Dedicate at least one day in the month before the move to sort through old files and clutter. Hire a shredder or use a ‘secure disposal’ contractor to dispose of unwanted confidential papers.

6. Get quotes from reputable removal companies. When you have chosen a company confirm the number and type of crates needed for packing.

 

7. Notify customers and suppliers of your change of address well in advance. Order new stationery and amend all promotional material. Contact your telephone service provider to find out how you can move premises with minimum disruption — you may be able to keep your old number or pay for calls to be diverted.

8. Draw up a detailed floor plan for your new premises and decide where furniture, telephone and computer systems will go. Arrange for re-wiring at the new premises if necessary.

9. Make sure there is a business continuity plan in place so you can continue to operate after the move — it may take longer than you think to get everything running normally. Print a copy of your database to allow immediate access to important contact details.

10. Before the move, mark every item that you will be transporting with a colour-coded sticker to indicate where it will be positioned in your new premises and/or which member of staff it belongs to. To avoid confusion, make sure the colour coding is shown on your new floor plan.

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